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The Chinese Medicine Forestry Trust charity has been set up by a group of Chinese medicine colleagues to respond to the climate emergency and the escalating rate of species extinction. In the face of these looming threats it is easy  to look away or to despair. However, we have decided to act. We love trees and believe that sensitively planting and protecting as many as possible is the simplest and most direct way to absorb carbon from the atmosphere and build environmental resilience. Please join us by making a one-off or - even better - a regular donation.100% of donations go to our three chosen tree planting organisations.

 

Peter Deadman has practised and taught Chinese health traditions and qigong for over 40 years

"I feel a deep connection to nature and experience real sorrow when I see and hear what we are doing to this beautiful natural world. And ever since I first learnt standing qigong (sometimes called 'standing like a tree') I have loved these wonderful plants (or are they creatures?). Let's join together as a community to plant and protect trees and forests all over the world." 

 

 

Charlotte Whitestone is an acupuncturist with a passion for accessible, equitable treatment for all. 

"A day and night with the kids in the woods, in a shepherds hut, to start off the summer holidays. It could have been the beach or a campsite, but the woods are where I want to return to, over and over. It’s a challenge to put into words, but here I feel right, correct. I don’t feel shut off from my environment like I do in the city or even in my own home where other species are seen as invaders. Here, my edges soften. I feel part of the whole. I can feel the myriad of interactions occurring; it’s like the insects can fly through me, the oxygenated air takes part of me that I don’t need any more, away. The light is beautiful this afternoon, the air sultry and warm with little breeze. I am not alone, but entangled with birds, spiders and their shiny strands of web, flies zipping and buzzing, and later a fox or badger if I’m lucky. This is a beauty that touches me, nourishes me. It is peaceful yet it’s the dynamism I love too. Perhaps if I listen keenly enough I can hear the creak of the trees growing, the caterpillars emerging, the cubs being born?

 

Effie Love is an acupuncturist, massage therapist, yoga teacher, point location teacher and the proud owner of ‘About Balance’ a low cost, fair trade, well-being centre.

"Back in the day I used to be a trekking guide, taking young people to nature, which I always loved. It was only years later though when I started practicing complementary medicine that I realised it wasn’t just ‘fun’, it was therapeutic. Our energetic body is just a microcosm of the world outside, and if we destroy that fine balance in the world we will only be harming ourselves (or is it that becoming so detached from our fine inner balance that enables us to harm the environment in such a way?), This is our final chance to do something to help save the planet from reaching a point of no return, and if there is a single thing we can all do now to make a real change planting a tree is it."

 

Jeremy Marshall is an acupuncturist, Tai chi & Qi Gong teacher. He is passionate about making the world a better place.

 When I grew up in Bedfordshire our house was close to an ancient woodland. I spent a lot of time in those woods. Walking the dog, making shelters, camping and generally messing around in all weathers and all seasons. On reflection my love of woods, trees and nature comes from this close and constant experience of getting to know every inch of those woods. Being in those woods was also, I realise now, my first experience of meditation. The stillness, peace and beauty of simply being in those woods is part of me and this is why I am compelled to be part of the Chinese Medicine Forestry Trust. To make a difference by preserving woodland, increasing tree cover and promoting biodiversity to counter the effects of climate change.

 

Katy Bradshaw is an acupuncturist who loves nothing better than adventuring in the forests and woods of Sussex and beyond.

"Once upon a time our island was covered in trees. Great forests of oak as far as the eye could see. Maybe because of this our connection to them is in our blood. After all, for millennia we depended on them for our food, fuel, materials and protection. Now they offer us our redemption. Our trees are our lifeline, our get out of jail card. We have the chance to  mitigate the harm we have done to the planet with every tree we save and every tree we plant. I am inspired by something Indira Ghandi said: "Have a bias towards action - let's see something happen now". It's easy to feel powerless in the face of the global destruction of our environment. Rather than bury our heads in the sand let us find small and real actions so that together we can make a difference."