Shopping Basket

Your basket is empty

JCM 120 cover
 
Features & Articles in this issue

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Editorial

Author: Peter Deadman

This issue marks the 40th anniversary of The Journal of Chinese Medicine. I started the journal in September 1979, typing articles with two fingers in my bedroom while a friend created headings using Letraset sticky letters. This was a time when there was virtually nothing written on acupuncture and Chinese medicine in English, and for the first few years we mostly fulfilled the function of the textbooks that had not yet been written...

One of this issue’s free sample articles

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Labour Preparation with Acupuncture

Author: Claudia Citkovitz

This article describes a comprehensive approach to systematically assess and prepare a woman for healthy labour and childbirth using acupuncture, bodywork and self care. It has been excerpted and adapted from the forthcoming text, Acupressure and Acupuncture during Birth: An Integrative Guide for Acupuncturists and Birth Professionals (Singing Dragon, 2019).

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Top Five Clinical Tips for Treating Children with Acupuncture

Author: Natalie Saunders & Katherine Berry

Babies, children and teenagers can all benefit greatly from acupuncture, although many acupuncturists feel ill-equipped to treat this group of patients. This situation means that not only are many young people who could benefit from acupuncture missing out, but also that many acupuncturists are overlooking an opportunity to build their practice and promote acupuncture to the next generation. In this article we share expert tips from renowned paediatric acupuncturists around the world to improve the confidence and clinical skills of acupuncturists when working with children, babies and teenagers.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Still Bleeding: A Recalcitrant Case of Metrorrhagia

Author: Toby Daly

This article documents an apparently textbook case of metrorrhagia that devolved into a series of clinical failures that the author was unable to resolve on his own. An outside consultation proved clinically decisive and the author learned not to cling so rigidly to his customary rules of practice.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

The Formula Presentation of Xiao Jian Zhong Tang (Minor Construct the Middle Decoction)

Author: Eran Even

The following article is based on research conducted for my doctoral dissertation and on many years of study with my advisor Professor Huang Huang (黄煌教授) at the Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine. The purpose of this paper is to present the formula presentation (方证) of Xiao Jian Zhong Tang (小建中汤, Minor Construct the Middle Decoction) and elucidate the correct patient population, symptomology and diseases most suitable to this formula. 

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Observations on Intrinsic Asthma and the Bladder Channel

Author: Janice Walton-Hadlock

In an emergency situation, the body has two possible responses: increasing the level of sympathetic mode above baseline or activating the mammalian dive reflex. The physiology of the mammalian dive reflex has long been recognised as consistent with the symptoms and chemical changes of intrinsic asthma. This article documents observations in five patients with intrinsic asthma that suggest that people who inadvertently activate the mammalian dive reflex, causing symptoms of asthma, do so because their bodies cannot adequately activate the sympathetic mode. According to the clinical observations of the author, an emergency-level increase in sympathetic mode requires a very specific set of channel qi alterations involving the Bladder and Kidney channels. In every intrinsic asthma case attended by the author, the patient had an obstruction in the flow of channel qi that prevented the patients from accessing or increasing the degree of sympathetic mode. When the blockages were removed using acupuncture and/or tuina, the ongoing asthma attack and/or the tendency for asthma ceased and did not return. This article is a call for replication.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

‘Do You Treat Cancer?’: An Open Letter to a Cancer Patient

Author: Andrew Nugent-Head

The following article is an adapted version of a letter written by the author to one of many patients who have asked, ‘Do you treat cancer?’. It is shared in the hope that it helps practitioners to answer this loaded question, and to mature the perspective of the Chinese medicine community on treating cancer and other serious diseases.

One of this issue’s free sample articles

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Skin Conditions and Chinese Medicine Dietary Therapy

Author: Sabine Schmitz

This article discusses the role of Chinese medicine dietary theory in the treatment of patients with skin conditions. An explanation of the Chinese concept of fā wù food is included, along with practical advice and useful examples for the clinical management of dermatological cases.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

  

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Acupuncture in the West: Diversity and Orthodoxy

Author: Charles Buck, Peter Deadman, Angie Hicks, Daniel Maxwell and Philip Weeks

This article is an edited and abdridged transcript of a discussion that occurred in London in September 2019 to mark the 40th anniversary of the Journal of Chinese Medicine, and follows on from two previous articles: ‘Acupuncture in the West’ (January 1985, with Peter Deadman, Ted Kaptchuk, Giovanni Maciocia and Felicity Moir) and ‘Chinese Medicine in the West’ (June 2009, with Peter Deadman, Hugh MacPherson, Daniel Maxwell, Felicity Moir and Volker Scheid). Present this time were Charles Buck (CB), Peter Deadman (PD), Angie Hicks (AH), Daniel Maxwell (DM) and Philip Weeks (PW). All are past or present practitioners of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine with different backgrounds and styles of practice. For brief biographies of the participants, please see the end of the article. The full article is available online.

Buy this article (free to JCM subscribers)

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Extraordinary Views of Abdominal Patterns: Fukosho-Kiran by Inaba Katsu Bunrei, translated by Jay Kagayama, reviewed by Victoria Conran Read the review and buy the book

  • Acupressure and Acupuncture during Birth: An Integrative Guide for Acupuncturists and Birth Professionals by Claudia Citkovitz, reviewed by Sharon Weizenbaum Read the review and buy the book

  • Clinical Guidelines to Medical Cases (Lin Zheng Zhi Nan Yi An) by Ye Tianshi, translated by Jerome Jiang with Lorraine Wilcox, reviewed by Douglas Eisenstark Read the review and buy the book