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The Treatment of Epilepsy According to Applied Channel Theory

Author: Wang Ju-Yi, translation and commentary by Jonathan Chang

This article is an excerpt from a manual that was written by Dr. Wang Ju-Yi in 1976 for a three-month teaching course in Mi Yun County, which was at that time a rural district on the outskirts of Beijing. The participants included local Western medical doctors, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) doctors and 'barefoot doctors' who were being trained in Chinese medicine. Dr. Wang discusses the treatment of epilepsy based on five years of experience specialising in the treatment of this disorder. At that time, Dr. Wang was 39 and had been practising for over 15 years. From a historical perspective, this was written at a time when Dr. Wang was developing the foundations of his Applied Channel Theory system (for more information see Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine by Wang Ju-Yi and Jason Robertson, Eastland Press,
0. Within the article, one can see some of his commonly used point pairs based upon his understanding of channel qi transformation. However, there is no direct mention of channel examination. Approximately eight years after this manual was written, he published his first article on channel examination to a wider audience (Wang Ju-Yi [1984]. A Discussion on the Unique Aspects of Symptom Pattern Differentiation in Clinical Acupuncture, Beijing Journal of TCM, 4, pages 24-46). Dr. Wang continuously refined his understanding of Applied Channel Theory up until his passing in August 2017. To help readers understand the point pairs and clinical cases, commentary has been added by the translator based on Dr. Wang's understanding of channel theory from the last few years of his life.

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Acupuncture in the Treatment of COVID-19: An Exploratory Study

Author: Peilin Sun & Wen Sheng Zhou

The coronavirus COVID-19 has presented a serious new threat to humans since the first case was reported in Wuhan, China on 31 December 2019. By the end of February 2020 the virus has spread to 57 countries with nearly 86,000 cases, and there is currently no effective vaccination available. Chinese herbal medicine has been used in this epidemic with encouraging results, but with concerns regarding disturbance of patients’ digestive function. This study aims to explore the role of acupuncture in treating COVID-19 by investigating relevant current literature along with classical Chinese medicine texts on epidemics. Based on this analysis, acupuncture points and strategies are suggested for practitioners to use as a guide to treatment.

One of this issue's two free articles

  

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The Chinese Medicine Classics – Read or Dead?

Author: Peter Firebrace

Are the Chinese medicine classics just the dead thoughts of dead men, outdated and superseded, or an essential living source of inspiration and knowledge? This article gives an overview of several key chapters in the Huangdi Neijing Suwen (Yellow Emperor's Internal Classic, Essential Questions), showing their value in preserving key concepts of traditional Chinese medicine. The discussion includes the importance of a balanced lifestyle that nourishes life (Suwen 1), the concept of alignment with seasonal qi (Suwen 2) and the idea of resonance as the basis of the yinyang wuxing system (Suwen 5 and 23). Examples of the relevance of this material to clinical practice are provided.

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The Treatment of Bruxism with Acupuncture

Author: Brechtje Sebregts

This article describes bruxism from the perspectives of conventional medicine and traditional East Asian medicine. Aetiology, pathophysiology and treatment methods are discussed and local acupuncture points on the jaw along the Stomach and Gall Bladder channels are described with particular reference on the psycho-emotional aspects of bruxism.

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The Use of Gua Sha to Improve Facial Expression Lines and Wrinkles: A Case Study

Author: Andrea Leite Barretto Domingues, Ana Francisca Neves Solinho, Cláudia Patrícia da Fonseca Pereira Sequeira, Diogo Fernando Rodrigues da Mota,, Júlia Maria Gomes da Mota, Maria Regina Rodrigues Campos, Nuno Miguel Ribeiro Moreira Tavares

Gua sha is a therapeutic method in which the skin is scraped using a tool with a smooth, flat edge. It is used to treat cosmetic problems, as well as common colds, flu, musculoskeletal conditions, respiratory problems such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema, functional problems of the internal organs, fibromyalgia and recurrent fixed pain. This case study investigated the use of gua sha in the treatment of facial expression lines and wrinkles. The results showed improvements in both, especially where there was a higher incidence of these features. There were also improvements in skin texture. These results provided cosmetic benefits and increased self-esteem for the patient. However, further studies are suggested to investigate this method of facial cosmetic treatment.

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Using Herbs That Clear Heat to Calm the Spirit

Author: Cara O. Frank

When confronted by patients presenting with anxiety, agitation, depression or insomnia, practitioners of traditional East Asian medicine often focus on the 'calm spirit' category of medicinals. However, this represents a limited perspective on the treatment of such conditions. This article documents the use of herbs and formulas that clear heat to effectively treat these problems. The traditional descriptors of xīn f.n (heart vexation) and f.n z.o (vexation and agitation) are discussed, along with an introduction to a constitutional approach to herbal prescribing. Finally, the role of the herbs Hu.ng Li.n (Coptidis Rhizoma), Sh. Gāo (Gypsum fibrosum), G. Gēn (Puerariae Radix), Zhī Zǐ (Gardeniae Fructus) and Li.n Qi.o (Forsythiae Fructus) are discussed in detail with regard to their spiritcalming actions and associated formulas.

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The Treatment of COVID-19 with Chinese Herbal Medicine

Author: Peilin Sun

Since its outbreak in Wuhan in December 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a global pandemic. There remains no cure for the disease caused by it, COVID-19, although the first vaccine trials have begun. Chinese medicine has a recorded history of millennia of combating epidemics. This article documents the significant role Chinese herbal medicine can play in the clinical treatment of COVID-19.

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Book Reviews in this issue

  • Hospice and Palliative Care by Torij Black

  • Chinese Medicine Psychology: A  Clinical Guide to Mental and Emotional Wellness by Professor Qu Lifang and Dr. Mary Garvey

  • Moxa in Motion with the Ontake Method  by Oran Kivity 

  • Classical Chinese Medicine by Liu Lihong