Shopping Basket

Your basket is empty

 
Features & Articles in this issue

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Fantasy Maps and How to Use Them: Rooting Channel Divergence Theory in Palpatory Experience

Author: Charles Chace

The channel divergences (jing bie) are an under-examined aspect of the channel system, and many of the ideas concerning their use are based on creative conjecture. As such the channel divergences provide a model for engaging many of the ambiguities inherent in the literature of Asian medicine. This essay explores the use of palpatory referents in developing theories and treatment methods within all aspects of Traditional East Asian Medicine and for the channel divergences in particular.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

 

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Integrating Daoist Zangfu Acupressure into Chinese Medicine Clinical Practice

Author: Andrew Nugent-Head

Daoist Zangfu Acupressure is a system of acupressure massage that involves manipulating the qi of the patient's internal organs via the abdomen. The analogy for this system is of 'playing' the patient's body like a stringed instrument, in which one hand presses down above to define the tension of the 'string' while the other hand plucks below. In the same way in Daoist Zangfu Acupressure the practitioner 'locks' points in the middle/upper torso while the lower hand rubs and massages points on and around the abdomen, influencing the qi inside the body. Moving through a strategic sequence of locks and plucks, the qi of the organs under the fingers is stimulated to return to a more healthy flow. By working directly on the organs and the passage of qi through the San Jiao, practitioners can effectively treat gastro-intestinal disorders, under-functioning organs leading to low immunity, or hyper-functioning organs leading to auto-immune disorders. This article describes the history, theoretical framework and basic practice of Daoist Zangfu Acupressure. 

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Powerful Communication Tools for Successful Acupuncture Practice

Author: Alyssa Dazet

 

This article presents foundational communication tools that acupuncture practitioners can use to facilitate both successful outcomes in patients’ treatment as well as busy, abundant clinics. These tools are explained and summarised as three exemplar scripts: the agenda, the treatment plan and the reschedule.

This issue's free sample article

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Yinyang Wuxing Yi versus TCM

Author: Rhonda Chang

There is a need to differentiate old style yi (醫), healing work, from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The perspective on life, spirit, body, health and illness in yi are based on the principles of yinyang wuxing. In contrast, TCM tends to favour a modern biomedical view of the body, health and illness. The ancient herbal formulas and acupuncture methods were originally developed to correct disconnections of heaven, earth and human beings. When illness and healing methods are understood according to the old yi method, this provides reliable clinical results. There exist incongruences between TCM principles and practice, which interfere with the practitioner's intention to achieve correct diagnoses and outcomes. This article gives a basic explanation of yinyang wuxing theory and how the practice of yi is different from modern TCM.

Buy this article (free to JCM subscribers)

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Treatment of Anxiety and Insomnia with Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs: A Case Report

Author: Melanie Hoang, Yong Deng, Yasmin Hilmi and Jeffrey Langland

Anxiety and insomnia are common symptoms of perimenopause and affect many women, reducing their quality of life. Acupuncture is often overlooked as a safe and effective therapy for this transition. A 52 year-old female with chronic anxiety and insomnia had worsening of both symptoms when she went through perimenopause. She received 16 acupuncture treatments based on a Chinese medicine diagnose of Liver qi stagnation and Kidney yin and yang deficiency. After nine acupuncture treatments and prescription of Chinese herbal medicine, her anxiety severity was reduced by 60 per cent, she was sleeping twice the number of hours per night and her energy levels increased. This case report shows the effectiveness of acupuncture and Chinese herbs in the treatment of anxiety and insomnia.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

Irregular Periods Treated with Body and Scalp Acupuncture: A Case Report

Author: Natalia Papazian

This article presents a report of the acupuncture treatment of a 39 year-old female who presented with irregular periods after stopping the contraceptive pill. She received nine treatments with body and scalp acupuncture over a four-week period. The patient showed a good response to the acupuncture treatment, which improved both the quality and regularity of her menstrual bleeding.

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

An Integrative Approach to Diagnosing and Treating Unexplained Infertility

Author: Katherine Alexander Anderson

Up to 30 per cent of couples trying to conceive worldwide are thought to have unexplained infertility, yet the diagnosis, treatment and management of these cases are often ill-defined, inconsistent and erroneous. A true diagnosis of unexplained infertility, which is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, requires a skillful clinician and appropriate diagnostic testing. Lack of consistent and standardised diagnostic protocols for couples trying to conceive frequently leads to non-identification of explainable causes and therefore couples do not receive proper treatment and lose valuable time. Finding no identifiable cause for infertility does not mean that one does not exist. Careful investigation of the male and female must be undertaken in order to properly diagnose unexplained infertility. Even after an exhaustive exploration, typical Western interventions are limited, costly and frequently ineffective. Integrating traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with orthodox medical diagnostics and procedures, or using TCM alone often offers the most successful approach to achieving a healthy pregnancy and birth in cases of unexplained infertility. This article explores unexplained infertility from an integrative perspective, and provides a diagnostic approach and treatment suggestions for TCM practitioners who wish to help patients and couples who have received this diagnosis. 

Buy this article (free for JCM subscribers)

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

The Management of Lyme Disease with Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Clinical Study

Author: Tianying Sun

The number of reported and confirmed Lyme disease cases has been increasing year after year since its first diagnose in Old Lyme, Connecticut, USA, in 1975. In both acute and chronic cases, Lyme has a heavy impact on patients' health and lowers their quality of life. Conventional approaches to treatment are often not fully satisfying for chronic patients. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), pattern differentiation for Lyme disease varies according to the duration of the infection and the stage it has reached, while the basic strategy of replenishing qi and tonifying blood runs through the entire treatment like a thread. For optimal results, besides regular treatments that constantly adapt to the evolution of the patient's condition, the patient's involvement and effective communication with other healthcare professionals are also needed. This article presents a clinical case study of TCM treatment of post-Lyme disease syndrome with positive results. Further research needs to be carried out and clinical studies need to be documented, analysed and discussed in order to establish the most effective TCM approaches to Lyme disease and benefit more patients.

Buy this article (free to JCM subscribers)

Show all / Hide all

fold faq

The Treatment of Meniere's Disease with Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine: A Case Study

Author: Lauren Salisbury, Yong Deng, Yasmin Hilmi & Jeffrey Langland

This article presents the use of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine to treat a case of Meniere's Disease. The patient presented with a five-month history of Meniere's disease which was caused by prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures. The patient had been evaluated by a head, ear, eye, nose and throat (HEENT) doctor, and a neurologist, along with being hospitalised weekly for severe episodes of vertigo. The patient had been treated with conventional medication, which did not resolve their symptoms. Over a period of ten weeks involving 14 acupuncture treatments and Chinese herbal medication, the patient's vertigo completely resolved and concomitant symptoms such as tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss also improved. The patient also completely discontinued their meclizine, which at the beginning of treatment they had been taking every six hours.

Buy this article (free to JCM subscribers)

Book Reviews in this issue

Humming with Elephants: A Translation and Discussion of the Great Treatise of the Resonant Manifestations of Yin and Yang
by Sabine Wilms
 
 
Treating Psoriasis with Chinese Herbal Medicine
by Sabine Schmitz