Shopping Basket

Your basket is empty

Research Archive

Welcome to our Chinese medicine and acupuncture research news pages. We add to the content of these pages continuously as more research news comes in. Browse through the complete archive below or use the category links on the right.

Please note that the most twenty recent research archive items are free to view but access to the thousands of items in the archive require a journal subscription.

Acupuncture-related lifestyle advice helps patients with chronic neck pain improve the way they care for themselves and is associated with reductions in pain and disability ...

Read more

Singing in a choir can reduce stress, improve mood and boost levels of immune proteins in people affected by cancer, suggests a study carried out in Wales ...

Read more

A UK study has found that group drumming produces significant changes in well-being, including improvements in depression, anxiety and social resilience ...

Read more

A brief walk in the forest can elicit physiological and psychological relaxation effects in hypertensive middle-aged individuals, according to Japanese researchers ...

Read more

Baseball’s oldest major league player credits acupuncture as the secret of his longevity in the game ...

Read more

Acupuncture, dietary therapy and tuina self-massage can be successfully used to treat hot flushes and other symptoms in postmenopausal women...

Read more

A five-year pilot study has shown that a comprehensive lifestyle intervention package may help reverse aging processes at a cellular level.

Read more

A 30-year long study has found that men with healthy lifestyles enjoy increased disease-free survival and reduced cognitive impairment as they age.

Read more

Meditation boosts the activity of genes involved in several processes beneficial to health, American scientists report. The investigators analysed the gene profiles of 26 volunteers, none of whom regularly meditated, before teaching them a 10 t

...

Read more

People with chronic inflammatory conditions - such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease - which are made worse by stress could benefit from practicing mindfulness meditation, according to a study by US scientists. The new study was

...

Read more

A study from Scandinavia has found a direct link between poor oral hygiene and cancer. People with the highest amount of dental plaque were nearly twice as likely to have cancer; in women, it was most likely to be breast cancer.

Read more

Remaining physically active in old age may help prevent the brain from shrinking, a process which has been linked to declining cognitive function. Scottish researchers, who followed a longitudinal cohort of 691 people, starting at age 70, found that

...

Read more

Contrary to popular perception, stressors don't cause health problems. It is how people react to stressors that determines whether they will suffer negative health consequences, according to American investigators.

Read more

Hong Kong researchers have found that taking part in mental and physical activities can delay cognitive decline in seniors with dementia.

Read more

Hong Kong researchers have found that taking part in mental and physical activities can delay cognitive decline in seniors with dementia.

Read more

Tai chi provides greater fall-prevention benefits than conventional physical therapy exercises for frail seniors, according to a Canadian study.

Read more

A study from the UK has found that breast tissue samples from women who underwent mastectomies for breast cancer contained traces of parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), preservatives commonly used in deodorants, body lotions and other cosmetic products.

Read more

A high urinary concentration of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) has been positively associated with obesity and insulin resistance in older Chinese adults.

Read more

A UK study suggests that living in a damp river valley at low altitude can increase the risk of developing lung problems.

Read more

A qualitative study from the UK has analysed how self-care advice is constructed in traditional acupuncture consultations.

Read more

Seniors who practice tai chi regularly demonstrate improved arterial compliance (the ability of arteries to expand and contract with the pumping of the heart), as well as increased leg muscle strength, according to a Hong Kong study.

Read more

A large, prospective cohort study carried out in Japanese seniors has found that consumption of green tea is significantly associated with a lower risk of developing functional disability (problems with daily activities, such as bathing or dressing).

Read more

A three-armed study in the Annals of Family Medicine has compared 8 weeks of mindfulness meditation, 8 weeks of moderate exercise and no intervention in the prevention of acute respiratory infections.

Read more

A satisfying life is good for the health of the heart, shows the results from a large study of British civil servants.

Read more

Auricular acupuncture (AA) can enhance athletes' recovery after strenuous exercise, suggests the results of a Taiwanese study.

Read more

Auricular acupuncture (AA) can enhance athletes' recovery after strenuous exercise, suggests the results of a Taiwanese study.

Read more

Research from the USA suggests that teaching mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) to urban youths may have a positive effect on hostility levels, interpersonal relationships, school achievement and physical health.

Read more

An extract of the spice fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) has demonstrated a significant positive effect on male libido and may assist in maintaining normal testosterone levels, according to research by Australian scientists.

Read more

A large Taiwanese study has found that exercising for just 15 minutes a day can reduce mortality and extend lifespan.

Read more

Dutch researchers have found that patients whose GP has additional CAM training have up to 30% lower healthcare costs and mortality rates.

Read more

Mindfulness meditation may help people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce the fatigue, anxiety and depression that often accompany the disease.

Read more

A large Spanish study suggests that an active commute to school can boost girls’ scores in cognitive tests.

Read more

Meditation can significantly reduce the unpleasantness of a noxious stimulus by engaging multiple brain mechanisms that alter the way the brain constructs the subjective experience of pain.

Read more

A study from Columbia has linked vitamin D deficiency with childhood obesity.

Read more

A supplement containing a mix of essential fatty acids has been shown to significantly reduce the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), by a Brazilian team.

Read more

A systematic review by UK authors has concluded that exercising in the natural environment leads to greater benefits in mental and physical wellbeing than exercising indoors.

Read more

Prolonged sedentary periods lead to larger waist sizes and higher blood triglyceride levels, even in subjects who exercise regularly, according to Australian investigators.

Read more

The children of mothers who drink milk containing a probiotic supplement during and after pregnancy have a significantly lower risk of developing eczema, according to a Norwegian study.

Read more

A probiotic supplement has been shown to significantly relieve the symptoms of infantile colic, compared to placebo.

Read more

A single course of antibiotics has been found to permanently alter the microflora of the gut, with unknown consequences.

Read more

Researchers from the USA have reported that a single massage treatment can produce measurable changes in the immune and endocrine systems of healthy adults.

Read more

Positive psychological changes that occur during meditation training are associated with increased activity of telomerase

Read more

Drinking several cups of tea daily can cut your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by more than a third, according to Dutch researchers.

Read more

Exercising first thing in the morning before breakfast can significantly lessen the detrimental effects of an unhealthy diet.

Read more

Regular exercise may prevent the common cold, according to a study by US researchers.

Read more

A collaborative study by scientists from China and the USA has found that 11 hours of meditation can induce positive structural changes in an area of the brain that helps regulate behaviour

Read more

Getting just the right amount of sleep is unequivocally associated with living longer, according to a systematic review by English and Italian authors. The researchers investigated the relationship between duration of sleep and all-cause mortality, a

...

Read more

Young women with stressful jobs are more likely to develop heart disease, a Danish study has found. The Danish Nurse Cohort Study prospectively followed a total of 12,116 nurses, aged 45-64 years at baseline, for a total of 15 years. By the end of th

...

Read more

Deet (for N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide), the active ingredient in most insect repellents, has been found to be toxic to the central nervous systems of both insects and mammals. Using toxicological, biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, Frenc

...

Read more

People who exercise more are significantly less likely to develop gallstones, according to UK investigators. A prospective cohort study followed 25,639 volunteers over 14 years for symptomatic gallstones, dividing them into four different levels o

...

Read more

A large Danish study has found a correlation between the amount of diet drinks consumed by women and their risk of going into preterm labour. The prospective cohort analysis of 59,334 women found that the risk of preterm birth was increased by 38% fo

...

Read more

Drinking alcohol appears to reduce the severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and also reduces the risk of developing the disease, in a dose-dependent manner, according to research from the UK. 873 patients with erosive RA, and 1004 healthy controls w

...

Read more

A large part of human milk consists of complex sugars that are undigestible by babies, but American scientists have worked out that its purpose is instead to influence the composition of bacteria in the infant’s gut. The researchers have found that

...

Read more

A sobering paper in the prestigious journal Lancet Infectious Diseases predicts a disastrous near future in which antibiotics are no longer effective against infectious diseases. The article explains how a new gene called NDM 1 discovered last year b

...

Read more

A systematic review by American authors suggests that mind-body therapies may be beneficial for alleviating specific menopausal symptoms. Eighteen clinical trials, involving a total of 882 women, met their inclusion criteria. Interventions included y

...

Read more

A German study has found that xanthohumol, a compound found in hops, can block the stimulating effect of testosterone on prostate cancer cells, raising hopes that it may one day be used in cancer prevention. The researchers found that xanthohumol bin

...

Read more

According to an American study people who regularly drink alcohol are more likely to exercise than teetotalers, and the more they drink, the more likely they are to work out. The authors of the study analysed data from a phone survey of 230,000 Ameri

...

Read more

A US study confirms - as drinkers have long maintained - that drinking whisky results in a worse hangover than vodka. However, the study also found that drinking vodka all night instead of whisky did not improve performance the next day. Ninety-five

...

Read more

Unlike abdominal fat, which is known to be harmful, it appears that fat stored on the thighs actively protects against heart disease and diabetes. UK authors have reviewed the evidence and potential mechanisms for a protective role of gluteofemoral b

...

Read more

A study by Swedish researchers has revealed that with regular exercise, teenagers genetically predisposed towards obesity can lose weight and keep it off. The study was carried out in ten European countries over 14 months and involved 753 teenager

...

Read more

Two US studies suggest that performing actions that have a moral implication, whether good or bad, may increase people’s capacity for willpower and physical endurance.  In the first study, participants were given a dollar which they cou

...

Read more

A US study has revealed that people behave in a more ethical manner in an environment that smells clean. The study was designed to test levels of honesty and charity in a group of volunteers who were exposed to citrus-scented window cleaner, compared

...

Read more

The popular belief that anger provokes a rush of blood to the head has been proved by new research. Experiments in an American lab showed that blood flow to the brain increased significantly in people experiencing mental stress. Fifty-eight volunteer

...

Read more

Chinese medicine links the health of the bones and the ear via the Kidney organ system. Now Western medicine is making this link. Sufferers of osteoporosis (low bone density) and its preceding condition, osteopaenia, are more likely to also develop v

...

Read more

Psychology researchers have determined that a gene linked with physical pain is also associated with sensitivity to social rejection. The US study indicates that variation in the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), associated with response to physical p

...

Read more

Breastfeeding a baby can significantly reduce a woman's chances of developing metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that makes heart disease and diabetes more likely in later life. Previous research has shown that lactating women have improve

...

Read more

People who get divorced or who are widowed are more likely to suffer chronic health problems, even if they go on to remarry. According to an American study of 8,652 people aged between 51 and 61, divorced people have 20% more chronic health condit

...

Read more

Drinking coffee when you’re drunk won’t sober you up. In fact a cup of coffee may make it harder for people to realise they’re drunk and therefore more likely to feel competent enough to try potentially dangerous things such as driving while in

...

Read more

Exposure to phthalate, a toxic chemical used as a plasticiser in a wide variety of personal care products and children’s toys might contribute to low birth weight in babies. Low birth weight is the leading cause of death in children under five and

...

Read more

A team of American scientists has reported that regions of the brain involved in emotional regulation are larger in long-term meditators than in non-meditators. The group used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of 22

...

Read more

People who are prone to anxiety are more likely to develop asthma, according to German investigators. The team used a questionnaire to evaluate tendencies to hysteria, anxiety and depression in 4010 adults without asthma. When they reassessed partici

...

Read more

Excessive exercise can be as addictive as heroin, according to US scientists, and stopping can lead to withdrawal symptoms. The scientists believe that extreme exercise causes increases in endogenous opioid peptides (endorphins), which act in the bra

...

Read more

Canadian psychologists have found that people with low self-esteem can actually feel worse after repeating positive statements about themselves. The researchers asked people with high and low self-esteem to repeat a positive self-statement ("I a

...

Read more

Radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) in the range emitted by mobile phones can cause damage to human spermatozoa. When an Australian team exposed sperm to RF-EMR they found that their motility and vitality were significantly reduced, wh

...

Read more

Smoking both tobacco and marijuana increases the risk of developing respiratory symptoms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Canadian clinicians surveyed a random sample of 878 people aged 40 years or older living in Vancouver about the

...

Read more

Ovulation-inducing drugs may increase the risk of women later developing uterine cancer. Israeli scientists have compared cancer incidence in a group of 15,030 Israeli women 30 years after they gave birth. Of the 567 women who had been given ovulatio

...

Read more

A US-study has suggested that some forms of post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can cause brain areas involved in thinking and memory to shrink slightly. The researchers carried out brain scans on 1,400 women aged 71 to 89 who had taken

...

Read more

Children who spend more than two hours a day watching TV have double the risk of developing asthma, a UK study has found. 3,000 children were tracked from birth to age 11. Their parents were questioned annually about incidence of wheeze and diagnosed

...

Read more

Being moderately overweight can reduce lifespan by two to four years, according to a major new study of obesity and mortality carried out in the UK. The huge collaborative study pooled data together data from 57 studies involving almost 900,000 peopl

...

Read more

US researchers exploring the cognitive benefits of interacting with nature have found that walking in a park in any season, or even just viewing pictures of nature, can help improve memory and attention. They compared the restorative effects on cogni

...

Read more

Young women with high levels of oestrogen are more likely to be serial monogamists or to cheat on their partners and also see themselves as more attractive than other women, according to an American psychologist. Two salivary samples were taken from

...

Read more

French psychologists have found out that women are most likely to give their phone number to a male stranger when they are most likely to get pregnant. Researchers recruited handsome young men to chat up women on a street corner, in order to determin

...

Read more

Shopping spree? Must be that time of the month. It seems that women can now add binge shopping to their list of premenstrual symptoms. In the 10 days before their periods begin, women are more likely to go on a spending spree, according to new resear

...

Read more

Animal research suggests that a diet high in inorganic phosphates (Pi), found in processed foods including meats, cheeses, beverages, and bakery products, may speed growth of lung cancer tumours and even contribute to the development of tumours in pr

...

Read more

A comprehensive survey of US drinking water has detected widespread but low-level contamination by a number of drugs and hormonally active chemicals. Scientists tested tap water from 19 US water utilities, which supply more than 28 million America

...

Read more

Breast-feeding reduces the risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) by approximately 50% at all ages throughout infancy, according to the results of a German case-control study. The researchers compared 333 infants who died of SIDS with 998 age-m

...

Read more

Dutch investigators have found that mild sleep disruption that induces shallow sleep, but does not reduce total sleep time, is sufficient to reduce hippocampal activation and interfere with learning and memory. The study involved 13 healthy subjects,

...

Read more

The stress and exhaustion of working long hours can affect the brain's ability to process information, according to a UK/Finnish study. The study examined the association between long working hours and cognitive function in middle age. Data were coll

...

Read more

Obesity gradually numbs rats tastebuds to sweet foods and drives them to consume larger and sweeter meals, according to American neuroscientists. Previous studies have suggested that obese people are less sensitive to sweet tastes and crave sweet foo

...

Read more

Being physically active improves brain blood flow and cognitive ability in older women. A US study compared two groups of women with an average age of 65. One group took part in regular aerobic activity, while those in the other group were inactiv

...

Read more

Breathing exercises can help asthma patients control their symptoms, according to a Scottish study. 183 asthmatic subjects were randomised to three sessions of either physiotherapist supervised breathing training or asthma nurse delivered asthma educ

...

Read more

Investigators from the US have carried out a randomised trial involving 74 patients with hypercholesterolemia who were either given 40 mg of simvastatin daily with routine counselling or an alternative treatment with therapeutic lifestyle changes, in

...

Read more

Nutrition and lifestyle changes may modulate gene expression in the prostate and decrease men’s risk of developing prostate cancer. In a pilot study, American researchers tracked 30 men with low-risk prostate cancer who had decided against conventi

...

Read more

Binge drinking increases the risk of stroke, according to the results of a Finnish prospective cohort study. 15,965 Finnish men and women age 25 to 64 years who had no history of stroke at baseline were followed up for a 10-year period. Binge drin

...

Read more

Vigorous exercise may protect women against breast cancer. 32,269 women enrolled in the American Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project were asked about physical activity throughout the previous year and followed up over a 20 year period. Rese

...

Read more

More than 50% of deaths in women from chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease could be avoided if they don’t smoke, watch their weight, exercise and eat a healthy diet low in red meat and trans-fats. A prospective cohort study, part of th

...

Read more

The established Israeli practice of ‘medical clowning’ hit UK headlines in November when it was reported that entertaining women with clowns after embryo transfer could boost IVF pregnancy rates. A team studied 186 women aged 25 to 40 over 10 mon

...

Read more

Researchers from the USA have found that happiness can spread from person to person. The data analysed comes from the Framingham Heart Study and involved 4739 individuals followed from 1983 to 2003. Participants were asked to identify their relatives

...

Read more

Children born to mothers who drink lightly during pregnancy (one to two units of alcohol per week or per occasion) are not at increased risk of behavioural difficulties or cognitive deficits compared with children of abstinent mothers, according to a

...

Read more

A small preliminary study suggests that antidepressants could impair male fertility by causing DNA damage to sperm. A US team gave 35 healthy men doses of the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor paroxetine) for five weeks, and examined their sperm

...

Read more